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Google關鍵字 金隅國藥成熱門

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Google昨天宣布,2009年全年香港熱門關鍵字(Zeitgeist)排行榜,金融方面的搜尋統計,結果銀行界三甲順序是滙控(005)、渣打(2888)、恒生(011),第四則為中銀(2388)。港股依次為金隅(2009)、國藥(1099)、滙控,以及中冶(1618)。

根據Google剛公布的年度銀行搜尋排行榜顯示,今年3月宣布「世紀供股」的滙控成為榜首,而捲入雷曼迷債事件的中銀亦「成功」上榜;其他較熟識的名字包括交行(3328)及工行(1398),分列第八及第九位。

其中較不為人知的,可能是排名第五的印度第四大銀行HDFC,該行於今年8月初獲金管局授予銀行牌照。

股票方面,自然是新股的天下,除了近日有機會再變紅底股的滙控(第三)外,「十隻有九隻」都是新股,首三隻順序為金隅、國藥及中冶,相信與金隅最先上市有關;而國藥及中冶亦是新股中的熱門,華南城(1668)及霸王(1338)則排名第五及第六位。

Google排行榜是統計及分析今年人氣網絡搜尋關鍵字的趨勢,從多方面的關鍵字搜尋,回顧過去一年網民最關心的人物、時事,以及迅速冒起的人氣搜尋關鍵字。

Google透過所收到成千上萬的搜尋查詢,總結發表互聯網Zeitgeist(德譯「時代精神」)。

本年政治人物搜尋次數最多的,並非早前旋風式訪華的美國總統奧巴馬(第三),而是傳遭雙規的前深圳市市長許宗衡。緊隨其後的是捲入「求愛不遂」風波的立法會議員甘乃威;今年趁六四事件二十周年推出回憶錄的中共前總書記趙紫陽則名列第四,而特首曾蔭權排名第五■

December 2, 2009 Posted by | Google / Internet | Leave a comment

CHART OF THE DAY: Google Searchers Are Obsessed With The Dollar Collapse

Google a way to track sentiment:

http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-gold-and-dollar-collapse-2009-10?utm_source=Triggermail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Clusterstock%20Chart%20of%20the%20Day,%20Wednesday,%2010/21/09

If you believe in the wisdom of crowds, then rising google searches for ‘dollar collapse’ are a bad sign.

While Google data is choppy, search queries have basically doubled since the start of 2008.

‘Buy gold’ searches have also doubled since the start of 2008. Searches for this have tracked those for ‘dollar collapse’ relatively well as shown by the two shared spikes in 2008, plus the shared bottom in 2009.

If fears over a dollar collapse ebb, it is clear which way the ‘buy gold’ trend will go.

google

October 22, 2009 Posted by | Google / Internet | Leave a comment

Facebook: United States Gross National Happiness

United States Gross National Happiness

http://apps.facebook.com/usa_gnh/

Every day, millions of people share how they feel with the people who matter the most in their lives through status updates on Facebook. These updates are tiny windows into how people are doing. They’re brief, to the point and descriptive of what’s going on this week, today or right now. Grouped together, these updates are indicative of how we are collectively feeling. Measuring how well-off, happy or satisfied with life the citizens of a nation are is part of the Gross National Happiness movement. When people in their status updates use more positive words–or fewer negative words–then that day as a whole is counted as happier than usual. (To protect your privacy, no one at Facebook actually reads the status updates in the process of doing this research; instead, our computers do the word counting after all personally identifiable information has been removed.)

The graph contains several metrics. The first, GNH represents our measure of Gross National Happiness. The other two, Positivity and Negativity, represent the two components of GNH: The extent to which words used on that day were positive and negative. Gross National Happiness is the difference between the positivity and negativity scores, though they are interesting to view on their own.

You may notice that Positivity and Negativity are going down over time–that’s because as Facebook grows, there is more variability in the Facebook demographic and how people use status updates (using more or less emotional words). That’s why the GNH metric looks at the difference rather than the raw scores.

October 13, 2009 Posted by | Google / Internet, Indicator setup | 6 Comments

How Happy Are We? (Facebook)

How Happy Are We?
by Adam D. I. Kramer Mon at 12:28pm
http://blog.facebook.com/blog.php?post=150162112130

Every day, through Facebook status updates, people share how they feel with those who matter most in their lives. These updates are tiny windows into how people are doing. They’re brief, to the point, and descriptive of what’s going on this week, today or right now.

Grouped together, these updates are indicative of how we are collectively feeling. At Facebook, we’re always looking for ways to help people better understand the world around them, and we’re interested in how people express their emotions with one other and the world. So earlier this year, data scientists at Facebook started a project to measure the overall mood of people from the United States on Facebook, based on the sentiment expressed in status updates.

The result was an index that measures how happy people on Facebook are from day-to-day by looking at the number of positive and negative words they’re using when updating their status. When people in their status updates use more positive words—or fewer negative words—then that day as a whole is counted as happier than usual.

Though more countries or languages may be added later, the current result is notable since it is based on the updates of all English-speaking U.S. Facebook users. In this sense, it can count as an indicator of “Gross National Happiness,” a metric only measured currently via Gallup polls and national surveys in countries such as France and Bhutan. To protect your privacy, no one at Facebook actually reads the status updates in the process of doing this research; instead, our computers do the word counting after all personally identifiable information has been removed.

For our Gross National Happiness index, we adapted a collection of positive and negative emotion words built by social psychologists. Examples of positive or happy words include “happy,” “yay” and “awesome,” while negative, or unhappy words, include “sad,” “doubt” and “tragic.” We also did a brief survey of some Facebook users, which showed that people who use more positive words, relative to the number of negative words, reported higher satisfaction with their lives.

Over time, we’ve seen spikes in the index for different days of the year. Some of the happiest days include U.S. national holidays like Thanksgiving and Fourth of July, social holidays like Halloween and religious holidays including Christmas and Easter. Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2008—when the U.S. was celebrating the election of President Barack Obama—was over twice as happy as the average Wednesday.

October 8, 2009 Posted by | Google / Internet, Tools | Leave a comment

Google Domestic Trends

Google Domestic Trends

by CalculatedRisk on 9/08/2009 12:46:00 PM

Here is an interesting resource from Google: Domestic Trends. (ht Brian) Google is tracking search trends for several specific sectors of the economy.

As an example, below is a screen capture of the Auto Buyers Index.

Google Auto Buyers Index Click on graph for larger image in new window.

This shows the seasonality of car buying, plus the Cash-for-clunkers surge in searches. Click on link for interactive graph – you can also plot the data YoY.

I also recommend real estate, rental (still weak) and unemployment.

September 10, 2009 Posted by | Google / Internet | Leave a comment